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Building Social Emotional Skills through Coding
Educational resources

Building Social Emotional Skills through Coding 

What do you think of when you hear the word “coding”? It’s easy to imagine an adult sitting at a computer and typing for hours on end, but in reality, the basics of coding can be learned at an early age.

Coding teaches three basic skills that can be used throughout our lives: resiliency, problem solving and following through. These social emotional skills can be learned through coding but can be taken into completing homework, experimenting with creativity and much more.

Resiliency

Resiliency is a key skill that can be learned early on. Toddlers and preschoolers can learn this skill by playing games like Simon Says or other games that help build a child’s memory. Following basic instructions, identifying when they got an instruction wrong and correcting helps build that resilience. Learning Resources Coding Critters are also a great way to practice following instructions and teach kids that mistakes are a learning opportunity.

Problem Solving

Similar to resiliency, problem solving encourages kids to think differently. When your child is faced with a challenge, rather than giving up, encourage them to think of a different way to approach the situation. This is especially applicable when children ask for help. Do they really need help, or could they think about the problem differently? Problem solving is a lifelong skill that can be learned through coding and is a major social emotional skill for children to have in their toolbox.

Following Through

Once kids have identified an alternative solution, it’s important that they take the next step to follow through. Making sure that kids can see the value in finishing a task from start to finish is important, especially in older children. Coding teaches this skill through reaping the benefits of a completed project. Learning Resources’ Botley helps kids see this value when their toy does what the child intends it to.

Finding ways to challenge your child to problem solve and follow through in basic actions around the house helps build that resiliency that they will use in years to come. Check out our recap of an IG Live with Amy Torf of Noggin Builders as she discussed ways to practice coding screen-free at home.

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